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InfoBlog

Green Stormwater Infrastructure and Low-Impact Development, Simplified.

Green Stormwater Infrastructure and Low-Impact Development, Simplified.

All of these pollutants entering our waterways and wreaking havoc on our aquatic ecosystems, recreation, drinking water, and fisheries industry...it's a bit daunting. To address it in a stepwise, systemic approach, everyone - and I mean everyone - has to be on board. In the meantime, both individuals and communities are embracing low-impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) as a cost-effective way to almost completely treat stormwater runoff before it hits surface and groundwater. As a result of significant improvements in water quality, we see an abundance of benefits, ranging from reduced water treatment costs to safe swim zones and recharged groundwater. And the use of GI/LID reduces discharge of polluted stormwater runoff to waterways by millions of gallons annually. Millions. Read more

Going with the (Stormwater) Flow

Going with the (Stormwater) Flow

A lot of the discussion around stormwater focuses on the types and amounts of pollutants -- both point source and non-point sources -- carried in stormwater runoff to surface water. While BMPs are primarily designed to treat or remove the pollution, they are also often designed to reduce the rate of flow of stormwater runoff entering and moving through a system. Read more

Stormwater Monitoring Requirements - Ambient Sampling

Stormwater Monitoring Requirements - Ambient Sampling

Phase I MS4s conduct ambient monitoring of surface waters, such as lakes, streams, and rivers, during normal (non-storm) events to establish baseline conditions, i.e., water quality without direct effects from stormwater runoff. While these conditions are considered normal, that is not to say impacts are not identified. In fact, several of the parameters measured and identified during ambient sampling events can only be a direct result of human impacts and are examples of residual impacts from stormwater runoff. The data also provide a reference point for wet weather conditions, i.e., a baseline to compare pre- vs. post-runoff water quality. Read more

Leading Causes of Water Quality Impairment

Leading Causes of Water Quality Impairment

As noted in previous posts, stormwater generates most of the water pollution observed in urban areas, and stormwater runoff results in water quality impairment in both urban and downstream surface water ecosystems. Interestingly, different water bodies exhibit different types and scale of pollutants, as shown below. Designing BMPs to address specific types of contaminants relative to the surface water body that is - or will be - impacted by redevelopment could be a step in the right direction toward successfully mitigating stormwater impacts on aquatic habitats and organisms, as well as our own drinking water. Read more

Maintenance Programs Benefit EVERYONE

Maintenance Programs Benefit EVERYONE

Whether you’re a stormwater service provider who is looking to increase your revenue and build stability into your business model, or a property manager who is tired of getting surprised with inspection requirements and fines from the city, or even a municipality who is trying to save money but clean up your stormwater system, implementing a preventative maintenance program may be the way to go. Read more

Business Rockstars: StormSensor Co-Founder Erin Rothman - Being Bullied & Rising Above

Business Rockstars: StormSensor Co-Founder Erin Rothman - Being Bullied & Rising Above

StormSensor CEO Erin Rothman opens up about being bullied in middle school, hating herself and life in general, and the realization that changed her life. See the full two minute video at Business Rockstars. Read more

Stormwater Quality in Urban Environments (shockingly) Gets Worse the More Urban It Gets

Stormwater Quality in Urban Environments (shockingly) Gets Worse the More Urban It Gets

One of the most comprehensive urban vs. non-urban stormwater studies was conducted by the U.S. EPA's National Urban Runoff Program (NURP) between 1978 and 1983, covered 2,300 storm events, and compared stormwater pollutant loading according to the type of urban land use. Understanding what pollutants come from which environments allows scientists and engineers to implement BMPs specifically designed to address stormwater quality for a given area. And for everyone else - it helps individuals make decisions regarding their own runoff and how they can do their part to make a difference. Read more

Pollutants in Urban vs. Non-Urban Stormwater Runoff

Pollutants in Urban vs. Non-Urban Stormwater Runoff

One of the most comprehensive urban vs. non-urban stormwater study was conducted by the U.S. EPA's National Urban Runoff Program (NURP) between 1978 and 1983, covered 2,300 storm events, and compared stormwater quality between three types of urban land uses (residential, mixed-use, and commercial) and non-urban land use. Read more

How Your Stormwater Systems Actually Work

How Your Stormwater Systems Actually Work

Most people glance down at a catch basin, maybe notice the “do not dump, drains to river” stickers. But have you ever wondered what really happens to our stormwater? More than 10 trillion gallons of this stuff flows across our properties and under our streets every year. It carries pollution, debris, sediment, and bacteria to our fresh water systems. Turns out it’s worth thinking about! Read more

From Droughts to Floods?

From Droughts to Floods?

Impervious surfaces - such as roofs, roads, and parking lots - generate between 5 and 16 times the stormwater runoff of that generated in natural/unpaved areas. Read more

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